Squamous Carcinoma of the Eyelid

By Paul T. Finger, MD

 

Note the relatively flat surface, red (indurated – inflammed edges, and the white flakey material on the right side of its surface.

Description

Squamous carcinomas of the eyelid can locally invade the orbit and sinuses, but rarely metastasizes. It is the second most common malignant eyelid tumor, but is 10 times less common than basal cell carcinoma. This should not be confused with conjunctival squamous carcinoma, which is the most common conjunctival cancer and can spill over onto the eyelid skin.

Symptoms

Squamous eyelid carcinoma can have symptoms that range from the appearance of a hypervascular flat pale, reddish or flaky lesion on the eyelid skin to a thickened well-demarcated reddish, flat tumor surrounded by inflammation (with or without scaling from its surface).

Diagnosis

Squamous carcinoma of the eyelid should be photographed at baseline. These lesions can remain unchanged (for years), then invade into the dermis and grow. A simple wedge biopsy can be performed and sent for pathologic evaluation. Once the diagnosis of squamous carcinoma is biopsy proven, definitive treatment is needed.

Treatments

Like basal cell carcinomas, squamous cell cancers of the eyelid rarely metastasize. However, they can grow around the eye into the orbit, sinuses and brain. Therefore, early intervention with complete excision or destruction is warranted.

Surgical approaches depend on the doctors training. Eye care specialists will either perform a planned excision with frozen-section control (of the margins) or the Moh’s Technique. Both types of surgery are used to remove the entire tumor along with a safety zone of normal appearing tissue from the edges of surgical wound (margins). No comparative studies have definitively shown that one technique better than the other. Both surgeries require a cosmetic surgical repair to return eyelid function and cosmesis. When the orbit and sinuses are not involved, local excision is usually curative.

Extension into the orbit and sinuses typically requires more extensive surgery (exenteration, sinusectomy) with subsequent radiation therapy.

At the New York Eye Cancer Center, we have treated select patients with small squamous carcinomas of the eyelid with topical chemotherapy agents or freezing (cryotherapy) using “Finger-tip” applicators. Dr. Finger tries to avoid surgery when possible.

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Sebaceous Carcinoma of the Eyelid

By Paul T. Finger, MD

Description

Sebaceous carcinoma arises from the glands within the eyelids, caruncle or eyebrow. They are more commonly found on the upper eyelid and in middle-aged patients.

Symptoms

Sebaceous cell carcinoma is suspected due to evidence of eyelash loss and the formation of a yellow-nodule. This tumor can also present as a persistent (months) non-responsive blepharitis or conjunctivitis. In these cases, a high index of suspicion for sebaceous cell carcinoma will lead to biopsy and the diagnosis. Once sebaceous carcinoma is suspected a biopsy is warranted. Before surgery, the pathologist should be advised of this possible diagnosis so the specimen can be processed appropriately
Sebaceous cell carcinoma is suspected due to evidence of eyelash loss and the formation of a yellow-nodule. This tumor can also present as a persistent (months) non-responsive blepharitis or conjunctivitis. In these cases, a high index of suspicion for sebaceous cell carcinoma will lead to biopsy and the diagnosis. Once sebaceous carcinoma is suspected a biopsy is warranted. Before surgery, the pathologist should be advised of this possible diagnosis so the specimen can be processed appropriately

Sebaceous carcinomas are one of the rarest eye cancers and can look like a chalazion (stye) or conjunctivits. In that sebaceous carcinoma can mimick these relatively benign dieases, eye care specialists should be suspicious of this tumor in any patient with persistent conjunctivitis, blepharoconjunctivitis or chronic/recurrent chalazion. Therefore, any conjunctivitis or chalazion that is not getting better after 3 months of observation, should be biopsied.

Diagnosis

Sebaceous carcinoma of the eyelid typically presents as a yellow-nodule in the upper lid. The patient may have history of colon, breast, genitourinary or other skin malignancies (Muir-Torre Syndrome).* When a nodular tumor, it can cause eyelash loss, but is not painful (compared to styes). This tumor can also present as a hypervascular conjunctival tumor and tends to spread along the conjunctival surface. In these cases sebaceous carcinoma looks like conjunctivitis.

It is worth repeating that “any conjunctivitis or chalazion that is not getting better after 3 months of observation should be biopsied.” If cytopathology is available at your medical center, a scrape biopsy of the conjunctiva can be initially performed in the office setting. However, the gold standard for diagnosis of sebaceous carcinoma is histopathologic evaluation of a fresh tissue specimen.

Once the diagnosis is made, a metastatic survey is warranted. Sebaceous carcinoma can spread to regional lymph nodes (pre-auricular and cervical) as well as to lungs, brain, liver and bone. At The New York Eye Cancer Center, we obtain a total body PET/CT scan (from head to toes) for staging. Published series have reported that the occurrence of metastatic disease was dependent on the size and location of the primary tumor and occurred in up to 27% of patients. Local tumor invasion of the lymph nodes, orbit or metastatic sites were associated with a poor prognosis for survival.

Treatments

Biopsy usually requires a full thickness lid section sent for histopathologic evaluation prior to formalin fixation. Histopathologic evaluation reveals foamy cytoplasm (with hematoxylin and eosin) This specimen is found to be oil-red-o positive, consistent with sebaceous carcinoma. *note* Sebaceous carcinomas may occur several years before a gastrointestinal malignancy. This occurrence has been described as the autosomal dominant - Muir-Torre Syndrome.
Biopsy usually requires a full thickness lid section sent for histopathologic evaluation prior to formalin fixation. Histopathologic evaluation reveals foamy cytoplasm (with hematoxylin and eosin) This specimen is found to be oil-red-o positive, consistent with sebaceous carcinoma. *note* Sebaceous carcinomas may occur several years before a gastrointestinal malignancy. This occurrence has been described as the autosomal dominant – Muir-Torre Syndrome.

Treatment requires a resection of the malignancy. Frozen section control can be used to provide negative margins. Larger surgeries, cryodestruction and radiation may be required if resection is not possible. Exenteration (complete removal of the orbital contents is sometimes required for extensive or recurrent disease).

* Muir-Torre Syndrome: A rare, genetically autosomal dominant cancer syndrome. Patients with Muir-Torre can develop cancer of the colon, breast, genitourinary tract, skin and eye lesions, including keratoacanthomas and sebaceous carcinoma.

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Benign Eyelid Tumors – Capillary Hemangioma

By Paul T. Finger, MD

Description

These tumors typically grow and then spontaneously decrease in size.
These tumors typically grow and then spontaneously decrease in size.

Congenital “strawberry-spot” which usually will spontaneously get smaller “involute.”

Treatment is indicated for the prevention of amblyopia (loss of vision) and strabismus (misdirected eyes). These tumors naturally grow and then spontaneously decrease in size. Therefore, if the tumor is not harming the child, it can be observed untreated for spontaneous regression.

Symptoms

Capillary hemangiomas are typically found at birth. They will grow during the first decade (10 years) and most will shrink (involute). If they involve the eyelids, they can cover the eye and cause loss of vision (amblyopia). It is very important that children with capillary hemangiomas be seen by a pediatric ophthalmologist and eye cancer specialist immediately.

Diagnosis

Capillary hemangioma is diagnosed by clinical examination. It has a typical appearance and biopsy is rarely needed. It appears as a reddish tumor or mass beneath the skin. The eye care specialist will order a radiographic scan (MRI or CT) to see how deep the tumor extends into the orbit (around the eye). The child’s pediatrician should be advised and the child inspected for hemangiomas on other parts of the body.

Treatments

Observation for spontaneous resolution is commonly performed. If the tumor is blocking the eye and vision causing amblyopia, then it can be treated with an oral beta-blocker medication (e.g. propranolol) or injected with a steroid solution. This will shrink the tumor in an effort to uncover the eye. Surgery may be required to remove very large tumors. The child’s pediatric ophthalmologist may suggest that the other “good” eye be periodically covered with a patch to strengthen the tumor affected eye and prevent amblyopia-related vision loss.

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Patient Stories

"Very well treated by Dr. Finger. He explained everything I needed to know about my issue with detail and attention, putting me at ease and giving me confidence to handle this problem for the rest of my life.”
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